Business musings

Articles and thoughts about innovation

22
May
Posted by Debbie Stocker, stored in: Innovation  Our News  

Earlier in the year, we ran an innovation masterclass at the Coventry Growth Hub for the Coventry and Warwickshire Chamber of Commerce. It was great to see everyone getting their heads around innovation and what it means for their business. The event has been featured in C&W in Business and we thought you’d like to see the article.

Participants explore how to become more innovative during the Chamber’s January Masterclass run by strategic innovation consultancy Stocker Partnership

It’s looking like 2015 will be the year of innovation…

For the 30 businesses that attended the Chamber’s Innovation Masterclass run by Stocker Partnership, it’s looking like 2015 will be the year of innovation.

The well-attended event was relocated to the conferencing facilities at Cheylesmore House due to high demand from business professionals wanting to learn how to apply innovation in their businesses.

Innovation specialists Matt and Debbie Stocker from strategic innovation consultancy Stocker Partnership challenged participants to think differently about their businesses and to step beyond their everyday experiences.

They opened the group’s eyes to the fact that it is possible to innovate anything and everything within a business, rather than innovation being limited to the creation of new products alone.

Sarah Hickman from Public Marketing Communications said, “Innovation can seem like a daunting subject that doesn’t necessarily apply to your business on a day to day basis. When you think about innovation you tend to think of organisations like Apple. You might think, ‘I could never aspire to be an organisation like that.’

“The Masterclass has been useful because we’ve learnt ways that you can actually apply innovation to your business. Even if you’re a small business or a sole trader, you can still innovate and there are practical steps you can take to introduce innovation.”

The Masterclass covered a number of powerful innovation tools, from disruptive thinking that challenges accepted norms in your marketplace or company, to using the power of silent crowdsourcing to generate ideas and solve problems through BrainSwarming.

It also looked at how approaches from another industry can be introduced to expand thinking and unlock new ideas as the latest Software as a Service revenue models were applied to create new income streams. Participants worked hard throughout the morning to develop practical ideas that they could implement as soon as they got back to the office.

Matt Stocker, Director of Stocker Partnership, shared, “It was great to see everyone beginning to view themselves as innovators and starting to understand the value of innovation in their businesses at a deeper level. Innovation is a hugely powerful tool that can be used to drive revenue growth, reduce costs, solve complex challenges and differentiate businesses from the competition. I’m excited to see how the great ideas that everyone came up with will be applied in their respective businesses over the coming year and the impact that this will have.”

This article originally appeared in the May/June edition of C&W In Business, Coventry & Warwickshire Chamber’s official magazine.

16
Mar
Posted by Matt Stocker, stored in: Innovation  Our News  

Introducing our Stocker Partnership video! Filmed and edited by the talented Nico Turner, it gives you a short introduction to who we are, what we do and how we do it. If you like what you see and wish to explore working together, do get in touch!

 

Continue reading for the full video transcript

01
Oct
Posted by Debbie Stocker, stored in: Innovation  Leadership  
Allan MurungiIntroducing guest writer, Allan Murungi

Today, we’re thrilled to introduce a new guest writer to our blog, Allan Murungi. As someone who is studying for an MBA at Warwick Business School, we met Allan at a WBS case study event earlier this year and were instantly impressed with his passion and enthusiasm. In his own words, Allan is an Innovation and Creativity enthusiast, IT Professional, Warwick MBA student, avid book reader and (recently) keen (road bike) cyclist.

The story of IBM’s resurgence during the period 1994 to 1998 is a story of innovation and creativity from the bottom up, started and championed by David Grossman. Grossman’s vision and tenacity resulted in IBM transforming itself from a company that was in decline into an Internet Services firm that rode the wave of e-commerce opportunities to the tune of $20 billion by the end of 1998.

And yet this begs the questions: Who was David Grossman? How did he manage to lead this innovation effort at IBM? And can this innovation and creativity process be replicated?

In organisations, innovation and creativity have traditionally been considered the domains of Chief Executives and other members of the C-suite. The best example of this is perhaps John Chen, formerly of Sybase Inc., who is now leading the turnaround at BlackBerry. As recently as June of this year, BlackBerry has, under his leadership, reported a positive net income of $23 million, up from an $84 million loss during the same period last year.

Innovation and creativity are also generally considered the domain of Research and Development. For instance, the vaunted R&D division of Apple gave us the iPod and iPhone, while Pfizer, the US pharmaceuticals giant, has maintained its dominance through such R&D as developed Viagra.

Where does David Grossman fit in all of this?

During the Winter Olympics of 1994, David Grossman, then described as a midlevel programmer at IBM, sat at home watching the Olympics on TV. As the official technology partner of the Olympics, IBM was responsible for collecting and displaying all the results. This gave the firm the exclusive privilege of displaying the IBM logo at the bottom of the screen, together with an interleaving of IBM ads at regular intervals.

However, upon surfing the Internet, Grossman discovered that Sun Microsystems had set up a rogue Olympics streaming site, complete with the Sun logo and marketing. As such, if someone only had access to this online stream, they would be given the impression that Sun Microsystems was the Winter Olympics’ official sponsor!

Grossman promptly reported this to his superiors, which resulted in IBM’s legal team sending Sun Microsystems a cease-and-desist letter. But Grossman didn’t stop there. He saw the opportunity that the Internet presented and set out to get IBM on board.

First, he set up a demonstration for senior executives in which he showed them exactly what the Web was and the vast potential it held for IBM. This piqued their interest and got their support. Grossman then became the right-hand man to John Patrick, who was present at Grossman’s first demonstration and worked in corporate strategy. Together, they worked on projects to convert IBM’s disparate divisions to the potential of the Web and to design IBM’s first homepage. Grossman and a handful of IBM’s best Web engineers rescued the website that broadcast the chess match between world champion, Gary Kasparov, and IBM Supercomputer, Deep Blue. By the time the Summer Olympics came around in 1996, IBM had built the first ever Olympics website, which also happened to be the world’s largest website at the time. And by 1998, IBM had a huge web presence!

So what does this mean for innovation in your organisation?

Grossman was just a frontline employee. He certainly didn’t have responsibility for innovation and creativity in IBM and he wasn’t part of the strategic planning team. And yet his contribution is credited with enabling IBM to successfully harness the power of the Internet at a critical time, in turn ensuring that the company maximised its potential.

The question then is: Was IBM lucky to have the tenacious and passionate David Grossman on its team?
And the answer is: Absolutely!

Would IBM have got on board with the potential of the internet without him? Maybe/Eventually/Possibly.

Our questions to you then are:

  • What is your innovation and creativity strategy?
  • What are you doing to support and engage your frontline employees in innovation for your company?
  • Are there systems in place to capture the generation of ideas, select the best ones and try them out?
And for those of you who like the research…

The complete story of IBM’s turnaround can be read at Harvard Business Review:
Waking up IBM: how a gang of unlikely rebels transformed Big Blue

Earlier this year, we were busy researching, writing and designing the challenge for the 2014 WBS International Healthcare Case Competition.

Held on 25-26 April by Warwick Business School, the competition brought together multi-disciplinary teams from 12 university-based business schools across Europe. In a close-run contest, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford emerged victorious, walking away with both the title and the £4,000 prize.

Sponsored by global providers of transformational medical technologies and services, GE Healthcare, and global business and technology leader, IBM, the competition was focused on a big data solution designed to both stimulate progress in clinical neuroscience and improve outcomes for those with a neurological disorder.

Taking up the challenge to recommend a scaleable business model for this digital product were teams from Aston Business School, Cranfield School of Management, ESADE (Spain), HEC Paris (France), IE Business School (Spain), Lancaster University Management School, Manchester Business School, Mannheim Business School (Germany), SDA Bocconi (Italy), University of Nottingham, University of Oxford, and Warwick Business School.

Photo and Twitter collage from the 2014 WBS International Healthcare Case Competition showing the welcome icebreaker event on Friday night, the kick off of the competition day itself, and case materials.

On hand to act as a sounding board for participants as teams developed their ideas were experts from GE Healthcare, IBM, KPMG, the NHS Health & Social Care Integration Centre, University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire, Warwick Medical School, and WebMD.

Adding another invaluable perspective were Ken Howard and Dorothy Hall, to whom we were introduced by client and changemaker, Gill Phillips, creator of the award-winning Whose Shoes? approach.

Ken describes himself as an old biker, sci-fi fan, granddad, music lover and free thinker. He was diagnosed with dementia around 8 years ago but has been living with its effects for much longer. Although little can be done medically, Ken is determined to fight dementia every day by challenging himself and staying involved as much as he can.

I am conscious that I have a short shelf-life. It makes me impatient and frustrated that progress is so slow. I am trying to achieve as much as I can. There is life after diagnosis.

Dorothy is an Independent Social Worker and Practice Educator. Like Ken, and having had personal experience herself caring for a close relative with dementia, she is passionate about increasing awareness. Dorothy is also an advocate for flexible, personalised, imaginative care arrangements.

Together, experts and advocates prompted participants to an awareness of multiple perspectives and the vast array of complex challenges involved. Neurological conditions include not only Alzheimer’s disease and dementia but also stroke, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson’s disease and more. Collectively, such conditions are estimated to affect up to one billion people worldwide and the World Health Organization believes these disorders represent one of the greatest threats to public health today.

Photo and Twitter collage from the 2014 WBS International Healthcare Case Competition showing participants meeting with experts, teams working on the challenge and a team as they presented.

Not only was it timely to focus on neurological conditions but big data solutions to global health challenges are extremely current. Enterprises of all sizes are grappling with demanding technological, regulatory and market challenges, and the business models required continue to be disruptive. Neither the participants nor the judges had an easy task ahead!

In a twist on last year’s format, teams were judged over two rounds. Mannheim Business School, ESADE and Saïd Business School, University of Oxford emerged as semi-finalists, after which the three teams were given one final challenge to reconcile against the clock.

Photo and Twitter collage from the 2014 WBS International Healthcare Case Competition showing  the three semi-finalists (Mannheim Business School, ESADE and Said Business School, University of Oxford) in action.

After much deliberation by a judging panel that included senior industry experts and leading academics, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford were pronounced the winning team.

With combined experience in medicine, pharmaceuticals, neuroscience and computer science, the team not only delivered a strong presentation but were able to answer all the judges’ questions with persuasive reasoning and supporting evidence. Together, Grace Lam, Yen Nyugen, Marco Pimentel, and Sindhura Varanasi presented a well thought out approach to a tough challenge.

And although there could only be one winner, all were worthy contestants.

Photo and Twitter collage from the 2014 WBS International Healthcare Case Competition showing the winner's announcement, judging in action, and experts, judges and the WBS Executive Team..

Once again, feedback on the day was incredibly positive, and as Warwick MBA student and competition organiser, Corinne Montefort, said: “The competition was a great success.”

As always, it has been our absolute pleasure to be involved. The work of both WBS staff and the Case Competition’s student Executive Team was outstanding and we’ve been privileged to work alongside such an array of great people, from sponsors to experts and judges. Thanks must go to all.

Looking forward to next year and watching the competition grow once again!

In the meantime, we leave you with kind words from two members of the final judging panel…

Debbie and Matt of Stocker Partnership prepared the case study which formed the basis of the Warwick Business School International Healthcare Case Competition 2014. The quality of their preparation and investigation was impeccable and the case set up a highly engaging and challenging scenario on which the whole competition revolved. I’d have no hesitation in recommending Stocker Partnership for this or related specialist support and I’d be delighted to work with their team again!

Dr Jagdeesh Singh Dhaliwal
Medical Advisor, Healthcare Technology & Innovation, Global Government & Health
BT Global Services

I really enjoyed the case presentation, and given the time constraints, the scope was judged very well. Complex and with sufficient detail, the literature review, ambiguous data, overview of the environment, and the setting of some true and false trails for the students all worked well. If the participants worked well as a team, with the right experts – as Oxford did – then they could make a very good showing.

Alan Davies
Medical Director, Global Medical Affairs
GE Healthcare

Coverage elsewhere around the web

Warwick Business School: Said win £4,000 and WBS Case Competition

University of Oxford: CDT in Healthcare Innovation student Marco Pimentel and team from Said win WBS International Healthcare Case Competition

Mannheim Business School: MBS participants succeed at renowned Warwick Business School Case Competition

16
Jun
Posted by Debbie Stocker, stored in: Innovation  Our News  

We love all things innovation and are thrilled to be involved with the Marie Curie Centre for Analytical Science Innovative Doctoral Programme (Marie Curie CAS-IDP) as an industrial partner. Based at the University of Warwick, the programme has been funded by the EU under the Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development (FP7) Marie Curie Actions to train an international group of early stage researchers (ESRs) to carry out world-leading analytical science research under two multi-disciplinary themes:

  • Predictive modelling of bacterial cell division
  • ‘Quality by Design’ of pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical products

With an integrated approach that blends sectors, disciplines and nationalities, the programme seeks to produce new ways to solve problems innovatively and efficiently, and to train scientists who think creatively, innovatively, critically and practically. We were delighted when we were asked to be involved and it is our pleasure to offer an industrial secondment to one of the students, Erick Ratamero.

Erick is Brazilian, and in his words, he “studies interesting things”. His primary interest is in Mathematical Modelling and he’s bringing this to bear in both his research project and his work with us. In the last couple of years, he has worked with Evolutionary Game Theory, Innovation Theory, and has even done a bit of modelling for Sports Science. With diverse interests, Erick’s research project is focused on understanding the FtsZ protein and its effects on membrane remodelling in bacteria, whilst in his work with us he will be using mathematical modelling to understand social network effects. It’s early days yet as both projects take shape but we’re hoping for some exciting results.

Collaboration in the most beautiful city in the world

Famous for its cultural heritage, Venice is certainly thought to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world—a sentiment that I cannot disagree with. It is also home to much creativity and innovation. Somewhat of a fitting location for the most recent Marie Curie CAS-IDP Networking Meeting.

As part of the programme, regular meetings are held for students, academic supervisors and industrial partners to review progress, share training, further develop cooperative relationships, and to benefit from knowledge creation and sharing. We have just returned from such a session held at Warwick in Venice, a University of Warwick teaching premises housed in the 15th century Venetian Palazzo Pesaro-Papafava.

Collection of photos from the Marie Curie CAS-IDP Networking Meeting, May 2014. Clockwise from top left: whole group of researchers, supervisors and industrial partners standing outside on the balcony of Palazzo Pesaro-Papafava, Warwick in Venice; small group of ESRs mid-discussion in a training workshop; ESR talking to an academic member of staff about the poster describing her research; small group of ESRs mid-discussion during a training workshop; group of ESRs standing around a poster, pointing to its contents and mid-discussion; supervisors and industrial partners discussing the outcome of ESRs training sessions.

During the two day session, many interesting conversations were had, good scientific progress was made and collaborations flourished. Putting into practice some of the frameworks we love, Matt and I delivered two training sessions to the ESRs focused on creating great relationships with supervisors and industry liaisons. Together, we encouraged researchers to step into their supervisors’ shoes and explored ideas for how to manage well across projects, time, meetings and people.

 Collection of photos from the Marie Curie CAS-IDP Networking Meeting, May 2014. Clockwise from top left: close up of Matt smiling with Burano in the background; view of Santa Maria della Salute from the water of the Grand Canal; canal side view from the balcony of Palazzo Persaro-Papafava, Warwick in Venice; view from the Rialto Bridge at night time with lights glistening across the Grand Canal; Debbie writing on a flip chart during facilitation of a training session; view of a Venetian street with washing strung across the street.

We throughly enjoyed the whole experience and have certainly learned a lot ourselves. In addition to the scientific focus, one of the most notable features of the experience for us was the quality of conversations and the breadth of topics explored, from the chemistry of confectionery to a love of fiction, beekeeping to a shared passion for cars, biology to pilates. Such shared experiences build relationships and can also be the spark for new ideas. We ourselves have come away with food for thought and are looking to develop some of these ideas further in coming months.

Image credits

Collection One
Top left: Naomi Grew, 2014; used with kind permission.
All others: Alvin Teo, 2014; used with kind permission.

Collection Two
Bottom centre: Alvin Teo, 2014; used with kind permission.
All others: Matt Stocker & Debbie Stocker, 2014.

30
May
Posted by Debbie Stocker, stored in: Innovation  Psychology  

Uploaded to SlideShare a little while ago, we’re finally catching up with ourselves on the blog, so here is the second presentation in our Innovation Tools Series…

A short guide to photo diaries

A qualitative research method, photo diaries are a fantastic way to gain rich insights into people’s environment, behaviour, opinions, routines, likes and dislikes. The tool is not bound by language—instructions can be translated or even given in symbols—meaning that this form of research is accessible to almost everyone, whether they are old, young or speak the same language, and no matter what level of reading ability. Similarly, the method can either be low tech (cheap disposable cameras) or high tech (with loaned digital technology or via digital platforms). An easy, fun, engaging activity for participants that can be used over hours, weeks or months, photo diaries drive innovation by giving you direct access to someone else’s world.

For our short guide, view the SlideShare below.

14
Mar

Innovation is inherently creative. If you’ve met us, you’ll know that we live with one foot firmly in creativity and the other in business. We love post-it notes, posters, whiteboards and timelines. We like to tangibly interact with information.

As such, we collect tools, techniques and frameworks.  Where effective techniques do not yet exist, we create our own. Rather than hiding these ideas away, we thought we’d share them with you in an Innovation Tools Series. Launching today, we’ll be creating short guides to the tools we regularly use and love.

Here’s the first in the series…

A short guide to empathy mapping

Good business demands an in-depth understanding of people: your customers, partners and other stakeholders. Empathy mapping is a fun and visual way to change your perspective by putting yourself in somebody else’s shoes. In turn, this drives innovation by enabling you to discover unmet needs, identify frustrations, empathise with daily dilemmas, explore new perspectives and question your own assumptions.

For our short guide, view the SlideShare below. Links to an online template and downloadable empathy maps are also included in the presentation.

20
Dec

Christmas specialist, Santa Global, has released a new online slideshow showcasing the technological innovations behind the Christmas build-up, which have been developed in conjunction with Stocker Partnership—the company’s strategic innovation partner.

“With the help of Stocker Partnership we have trialled a number of technological improvements over the last twelve months,” reveals Santa Claus, CEO of Santa Global. “This has helped us streamline our operations and increase efficiency, so we are in great shape going into our busiest period of the year!”

Amongst the innovations taken up at Santa Global’s North Pole headquarters is a company-wide trial of Google Glass. Warehouse elves have been using the head-mounted computers to increase efficiency and Santa will benefit from the system’s voice-activated navigation and delivery data—as well as solar-glare protecting lenses—during his crucial Christmas Eve flight. Another development is the eReindeer programme, which has implanted chips in reindeer antlers to track in-flight performance as well as vital measurements such as body temperature and heart rate. On the ground, LED-embedded workwear for elves has led to greater visibility during the long Arctic nights and fewer accidents.

These are just some of the exciting range of innovations in place at Santa Global HQ. For the full story, please view the SlideShare below:

“Santa Global is a very forward thinking company and it has been a real privilege to work with the team during the past year,” comments Matt Stocker, Director of Stocker Partnership. “From Santa right down to the wrapping elves we have found everyone to be receptive to our ideas and the concept of change. That has made our job a lot easier and we are delighted to have helped with a number of strategic recommendations that have already transformed operations up at the North Pole. Of course, the proof is in the pudding but everyone is confident that Christmas 2013 is set to be the company’s most successful in its 1,700 year history!”

06
Dec
Posted by Debbie Stocker, stored in: Finance  Innovation  Leadership  Our News  

Are you determined to grow your business? GrowthAccelerator can help you get to the heart of the barriers that are holding your business back, enabling you to identify the critical steps you need to take to achieve your next phase of growth—rapidly and sustainably.

GrowthAccelerator logo

What is GrowthAccelerator?

Launched in May 2012 by Business Secretary Vince Cable, GrowthAccelerator is a partnership between some of the UK’s leading, private sector growth specialists and government, which has already fast-tracked over 10,000 businesses (of which 12% are in the West Midlands).

Supported by coaching, workshops and masterclasses, the service provides a framework to help you:

  • Build a successful growth strategy
  • Discover new routes to funding and investment
  • Unlock your capacity for innovation
  • Harness the power of your people

Whether it’s insight into what’s holding you back and developing a plan for the future, helping you build a case for investment and finding new sources of finance, turning your most innovative ideas into profit, or providing training and masterclasses to develop confident leadership and management, GrowthAccelerator is focused on a single goal: the growth of your business.

How does GrowthAccelerator work?

To begin, GrowthAccelerator will help you review your business’s current position and define a bespoke growth plan specific to its needs. This plan will outline the challenges your business faces and how GrowthAccelerator can offer support, be it through coaching, workshops or masterclasses.

In addition to support from a Growth Manager and Growth Coach, GrowthAccelerator gives you exclusive access of up to £2,000 match-funding per senior manager for your senior management team to hone their leadership and management skills.

You will also become part of the GrowthAccelerator high-growth community, giving you opportunity to meet and network with other liked-minded businesses and growth experts who have already experienced or are experiencing the successes you’ve achieved and the challenges you are facing.

How are we involved?

Matt is a registered and approved Growth Coach for GrowthAccelerator. As a Growth Coach, his role is to work with companies on a one-to-one basis providing relevant and individual support. He will act as an advocate and a catalyst for change. The help you’ll receive with GrowthAccelerator is bespoke and we work with you in a way that is tailored specifically to meet your objectives.

Under the GrowthAccelerator service, we are also able to provide match-funded training for your leadership and senior management team.

Who is GrowthAccelerator for?

Just as we love to work with dynamic and growing companies, GrowthAccelerator is for businesses with ambition, determination and potential. A few other criteria also apply: to be eligible, you must be able to answer yes to all questions below…

  • Is your business registered in the UK?
  • Is your company based in England?
  • Does your business have fewer than 250 employees?
  • Does your business have a turnover of less than £40m?

How much does GrowthAccelerator cost?

Your contribution will depend on the size of your business. With Government making a major contribution towards the cost, you pay only a fixed fee.

A table showing the fees for GrowthAccelerator: 1-4 employees, £600; 5-49 employees, £1,500; 50-249 employees, £3,000; for all size of business an additional £700 VAT is also applicable.

 

 

 

*VAT is based on 20% of the nominal value of the service, at £3,500, so all businesses pay the same amount of VAT.

Should you wish to then also access leadership and management training, match-funding of up to £2,000 per senior manager is exclusively available to your company.

Find out more

If you would like to find out more, why not give us a call on 02476 100 193 or contact us for further information?

To learn more about GrowthAccelerator, you can also visit www.growthaccelerator.com

23
Feb
Posted by Matt Stocker, stored in: Technology & Web  

Traxia EVThe ‘app’ concept continues to gain ground not just within IT but also in industries such as automotive industry.

LSN Global featured the new Trexa ‘car development platform’ – a fully electric vehicle-development platform that provides designers and manufacturers with the capability to design and develop unique designs without incurring the expense of developing new platforms. The resulting ‘app’ designs dock onto the platform and are fully interchangeable (i.e car to van to flatbed).

Key challenge

Whilst this looks like a great idea, I think that the key challenge with this technology will be pricing. It is likely that vehicle ‘apps’ will be produced in fairly low volumes and as a result it may be difficult to achieve the economies of scale needed to bring the price down. This could well mean that the resulting vehicles on sale are actually quite expensive compared to traditional vehicles from the volume vehicle manufacturers, rendering the ‘app’ proposition uncompetitive.

It has often been the case in the past that for ‘interchangeable’ products the resulting ‘options’ are actually just as expensive as buying another, brand new, fully functional product, thus rendering interchangablity as pointless.

So the key to this product’s success?

For those manufacturers already competing effectively in the niche electric vehicle market, this platform could be very good news indeed, resulting in significant R&D savings, access to the latest upgradable technology and a faster, more flexible, product development cycle.

In terms of the ‘interchangeable’ aspect of the vehicles, the keys to success are likely to be innovative, high-quality products, produced using low volume, low cost manufacturing, thereby ensuring that the designers of vehicle ‘apps’ really do have a significant price advantage against main stream solutions.

Would I buy one?

Well, if I could design my own vehicle online that I could fully specify from modular components and that was delivered direct to my door, that would be very cool indeed. However, for me, an Audi R8 or Tessla might be slightly higher up my wishlist!